#simplycreate Pouring Art

Helpful Tips For Acrylic Pouring

Getting started: For all projects protect your worksurface as this technique can get messy. A plastic sheet/tablecloth or a bin bag is useful which can be used again. A jar lid under your artboard helps to elevate it and keep it up and out of the tilted off paint.  Use a washable tray or plate to catch any drips, (an aluminium foil or baking tray also works well). For further acrylic pour projects a baking tray and rack is handy to have in your toolkit!


Drying: in most cases artwork will be touch dry in 24 hours, but it can sometimes take longer depending on how thick the paint is on the board. It is recommended  to place wet paintings on plastic (a bag or tray) or a baking sheet, rather than paper to prevent the wet paint sticking to the surface as it dries. Make sure the surface is level, so the paint settles and dries evenly.  

Excess paint drips: Any paint that drips off can be peeled away when dry and used as a ‘skin’. These can be used for other art and craft projects like jewellery and collages. 

Be experimental: Every time you do an acrylic pour it will provide a totally unique effect. Why not try out different colour combinations – you never know what you will get!


Materials Included

  • 6 x 18ml Pots of  Simply Acrylic Pouring Paint (Black, White, Magenta, Light Blue, Medium Yellow, Violet)
  • 3 x Simply Oil Artboards 10x10cm
Materials Needed
  • 1 x jar lid
  • 1 x washable tray or plate
  • 2 x plastic cups
  • 1 x piece of carboard
  • 1 x kitchen fork

Pouring Art - Pouring Puddle

A puddle pour involves dropping paint colours one on top of the other to create solid colour patterns . 

Step 1

Pour an amount of black paint on your board to act as a solid base colour, enough to cover it evenly. This wet base layer will help to improve the flow of the subsequent colourful puddles.

Step 2

Spread the base layer paint out evenly over the entire board. A strip of cardboard makes a good spreader tool.

Step 3

While your base colour is still wet, choose a contrasting colour and drop small puddles of paint,  leaving some spaces in between.

Step 4

Create more puddles using contrasting colours to fill the spaces. Expand these puddles by pouring additional colours into the centre of each puddle.

Step 5

Repeat this process until you are happy with the design. 

Step 6

Try tilting your board while the paint is wet to stretch the pattern until a desirable composition is achieved. Place artwork on a flat surface and allow to dry. Recommended 48 hours for total dry.  

Pouring Art - Fork Combing

A simple and effective fluid art technique that is fun to do creating patterns with a kitchen fork!

Step 1

Start by drizzling lines of white paint across the width of your board. About 5 or 6 stripes evenly spaced.

Step 2

Drizzle even stripes of blue next to the white paint allowing some space for a third colour.

Step 3

Repeat the design with yellow stripes filling in the gaps.

Step 4

Take a kitchen fork and starting at one edge gently drag the fork prongs through the paint towards the other end to create a pattern. Experiment with ‘worming’ the fork across for an interesting pattern effect. You may need to hold on to the board with your other hand to stop it shifting while you drag the fork across the paint. 

Step 5

Repeat this fork technique across the board. 

Step 6

Try tilting the canvas while the paint is wet to create further movement and effect. Place artwork on a flat surface and allow to dry. Recommended 48 hours for total dry.  

Pouring Art - Flip Cup

Multiple layers of coloured paint in a cup. Flipping the cup upside down and releasing the paint creates amazing and surprising effects!
 
Tip: leave this technique until you have tried the others and make use of the leftover white paint and the pot it’s in for flipping! 

Step 1

Start with a small amount of white paint in the bottom of the cup. White is often used to begin the layers as it is denser and more likely to create ‘cells’ as you flip the colours. 

Step 2

Pour the other colours one by one on top of each other in the cup to create a layered effect. The order here is; white, violet, blue, yellow, pink & black. 

Step 3

Holding the cup of colour in one hand, place the board upside down over the cup, the board will act as a lid so the paint does not spill out. Hold the board and cup together as you flip them over.

Step 4

The cup is now upside down on the board with the paint still in the cup. Wait a few moments for the paint to settle.

Step 5

Gradually lift the cup and release the paint, give it a gentle swirl as you do so to encourage distribution. If there are a few drips in the cup why not drop them over the artwork to create further effects. Let the paint flow toward the edges of the board, some excess may fall off the edges but this is ok.  

Tip

A strip of folded cardboard is useful for cradling the corners of the board to catch excess paint flow as you tip the board. Repeat this technique for each corner if necessary. Place artwork on a flat surface and allow to dry. Recommended 48 hours for total dry.  

About the artist:

The artist Jenny Muncaster is a graduate of the Winchester School of Art and has a studio in Winchester, The Colour Factory Studios and Gallery, which she set up in 1994.