Cryla - The Range

The new Cryla Artists’ Acrylic range has 87 colours and comes in 75ml tubes, 250ml pots and 500ml pots (6 colours only). Additionally there are two sets - the Cryla Starter Set (6x22ml) and the Cryla Introduction Set (10x22ml).

There are 27 new colours in the range which combine traditional old masters’ colours with the most modern pigments available today.

OLD MASTERS, METALLIC AND PRIMARY COLOURS

Old Masters Colours

 

Metallic Colours

Historically there were a number of colours that were considered essential by the old master painters. Over the years many of these colours have been phased out of common use, as the pigments used to create these colours were found to be unsafe or non-permanent/lightfast.

Daler-Rowney has recreated a selection of essential colours used by the old masters. Using blends of permanent, safe, modern pigments, these hues have been recreated to match the original pure pigment colours produced by Daler-Rowney in the early 20th century. These historical hues in the Cryla Artists’ Acrylic range allow artists to explore colours used by the old masters in a permanent, safe acrylic form.

 

Within the Cryla Artists’ Acrylic range there are 8 metallic colours: Pale Gold, Rich Gold, Copper, Bronze, Silver, Pewter, Black and White. These colours conform to the same exacting standards as all the other Cryla Artists’ Acrylic colours and have the same heavy-bodied characteristics.

All the metallic colours contain imitation metallic pigments and genuine metallic pigments. Genuine metallic pigments are not stable in acrylic colours, as they tend to tarnish in a relatively short period of time. Coated mica flakes are therefore used to give the impression of a genuine metallic pigment. The titanium-coated mica flakes used in Cryla Artists’ Acrylic give the colour a brilliant lustre similar to genuine metallic colour.

Colour Name

 

Reason for Original Pigment Discontinuation

Naples Yellow Hue   Lead-based pigment, classed as highly toxic
Indian Yellow Hue   Manufacturing process considered inhumane
Carmine Hue   Non-Permanent colour, fades rapidly
Crimson Alizarin Hue   Non-Permanent colour, fades rapidly
Prussian Blue Hue   Unreliable in acrylic colours
Indigo Hue   Non-Permanent colour, fades rapidly
Manganese Blue Hue   Pigment found to be highly toxic
Cobalt Violet Hue   Pigment found to be toxic
Sap Green   Non-Permanent colour, fades rapidly
Hooker’s Green   Unreliable in acrylic colours
Terra Verte Hue   Pigment became unavailable
Vandyke Brown Hue   Unreliable pigment source and quality
     

Primary Colours (CMY)

The Cryla Artists’ Acrylic range contains three primary colours: Primary Yellow, Primary Magenta and Primary Cyan, known as the “subtractive” Primaries.

They are known as primary colours because, in theory, all other colours can be made by mixing them. If you mix all the colours together you end up with black, or in other words, the absence of light, as the colours have subtracted all the light. This theory comes from an understanding of how the human eye works and how we perceive colour.

The human eye is made up of rods and cones; rods are more sensitive than cones and detect light, but they do not detect colour, hence when lighting is poor everything looks greyscale. For colour we are interested in the cones; the human eye has three type of cones that detect red, green and blue light. These colours of light are known as the “additive” primary colour; add them all together and you will get white. If you look at a pixel on a TV or computer screen you will see each is made up of a red, green and blue dot.

When the cones in the eye are stimulated, they send a signal to the brain that interprets it. This interpretation is done based on which cone is stimulated and by how much. i.e. if all the cones are highly stimulated the brain interprets it as white, if only the red cone is stimulated and none of the others the brain interprets this colour as red, etc. To explain this further we have to assume that sunlight or white light is made up of red, green and blue light.

When a primary colour is painted out it absorbs one of the additional primaries out of the white light and reflects back the other two to create the colour we see, therefore:

primary yellow   primary magenta   primary cyan

Primary Yellow

White light is shone onto the surface, the blue light is absorbed, the green and red light is reflected to the eye and we see yellow.

 

Primary Magenta

White light is shone onto the surface, the green light is absorbed, the red and blue light is reflected to the eye and we see magenta.

 

Primary Cyan

White light is shone onto the surface, the red light is absorbed, the green and blue light is reflected to the eye and we see cyan.

PRIMARY AND CONTEMPORARY COLOURS

If we take this theory further and look at black and white you can see that white is all light and black is no light, therefore:

white   black

White

White light is shone onto the surface, all light is reflected to the eye and we see white.

 

Black

White light is shone onto the surface, all light is absorbed by the surface and none is reflected back to the eye and we see black.

Now we will apply this theory to mixing colours. If we wish to create a green colour, we would mix Primary Yellow and Primary Cyan together in equal quantities. The Primary Yellow in the mix will absorb the blue light, the Primary Cyan in the mix will absorb the red light, so the only light reflected is the green light and hence we get a green colour.

lighteye

 

This also works if you mix all the combinations of primary colours. i.e. Primary Yellow + Primary Cyan = Green, Primary Yellow + Primary Magenta = Red and Primary Magenta + Primary Cyan = Blue. These three mixed colours are called the secondary colours.

lighteye

All colours therefore can be mixed from these three primary colours by varying the amount of each colour that you put in the mix. For example, if you wanted to create an orange colour you would mix Primary Yellow and Primary Magenta but not in equal quantities; you would need more Primary Yellow in the mix. In this mix all of the red would be reflected, all of the blue would be absorbed and some of the green would be reflected giving an orange colour.

This colour theory only works if you can produce primary colours that completely absorb and reflect the complete relevant areas of the colour spectrum. Moreover every primary colour has to have the same tinting strength. Currently there is not a pigment that occurs in nature or that can be produced in a synthetic laboratory that can produce these theoretical primary colours. Daler-Rowney has developed its primary colours in Cryla Artists’ Acrylic to get as close as possible to the ideal parameters of a “true” primary colour. The primary colours are created by blending pigments together to create the closest possible colour; all of them are transparent (opacity rating 1-4) to aid colour mixing.

Contemporary Colours

The Cryla Artists’ Acrylic range has a vibrant selection of 21st century trendy colours with the most modern purest pigments. These colours are a combination of brilliant and intense colours that complement the perfectly balanced range to satisfy the needs of acrylic painters.

Benzimidazolone Orange H5G
Pyrrole Scarlet
Quinacridone Yellow Red
Quinacridone Magenta
Quinacridone Maroon
Ultramarine Violet
Permanent Violet (Mixture)
Ultramarine Blue Green Shade
Cobalt Chromite Blue Red Shade
Cobalt Chromite Blue Green Shade
Cobalt Chromite Green

Colour Chart

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